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scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

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Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

(via jessehimself)


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micdotcom:

Shonda Rhimes decimates NY Times critic who called her an “angry black woman” 

note to critics of the world: When you’re talking to African-American women, don’t use the tired “angry black woman” stereotype.

New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley, whose journalism career includes a laundry list of inaccuracies and errors, published a disgusting assessment of how Rhimes and her hit ABC series Scandal have changed the television landscape for black women. 

"When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography," Stanley begins, "it should be called How to Get Away With Being an Angry Black Woman."

Rhimes didn’t let it go unanswered Follow micdotcom

(via jessehimself)


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jessehimself:

dulceetdecorus:
MISSING: 12-year-old boy from Montgomery County
WHEATON, Md. (WUSA9) — Montgomery County Police need your help locating a missing 12-year-old from Wheaton.
Rashad Williams, of the 3300 block of Hewitt Avenue has been missing since September 5th.
Williams is described as a black male, 4’8” tall and weighing 100 pounds. Williams has brown eyes and medium length brown hair worn in twists, police said.
Williams frequents the Aspen Hill/Layhill area of Wheaton, the Westfield Wheaton Mall and downtown Silver Spring, police said.
Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Rashad Williams is asked to call the Montgomery County Police Special Victims Investigative Division at 240-773-5300, or the police non-emergency number at 301-279-8000 (24-hour line). Callers may remain anonymous.

jessehimself:

dulceetdecorus:

MISSING: 12-year-old boy from Montgomery County

WHEATON, Md. (WUSA9) — Montgomery County Police need your help locating a missing 12-year-old from Wheaton.

Rashad Williams, of the 3300 block of Hewitt Avenue has been missing since September 5th.

Williams is described as a black male, 4’8” tall and weighing 100 pounds. Williams has brown eyes and medium length brown hair worn in twists, police said.

Williams frequents the Aspen Hill/Layhill area of Wheaton, the Westfield Wheaton Mall and downtown Silver Spring, police said.

Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Rashad Williams is asked to call the Montgomery County Police Special Victims Investigative Division at 240-773-5300, or the police non-emergency number at 301-279-8000 (24-hour line). Callers may remain anonymous.


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Just a pool, disguised as a pond, with a trampoline instead of a diving board.
I wrote a paper about these kinds of pools several years ago for a class when they were just prototypes. These pools have a natural filtration system that run based on the plants that are in the pool that give the water nutrients that allow it to not only be crystal clear, but you are also able to drink the water because it becomes so clean. And the best part is that once the initial filtration system is installed and calibrated, it maintains itself and eliminates the need for chlorine or constant maintenance like salt water pools. 


I want one

Just a pool, disguised as a pond, with a trampoline instead of a diving board.

I wrote a paper about these kinds of pools several years ago for a class when they were just prototypes. These pools have a natural filtration system that run based on the plants that are in the pool that give the water nutrients that allow it to not only be crystal clear, but you are also able to drink the water because it becomes so clean. And the best part is that once the initial filtration system is installed and calibrated, it maintains itself and eliminates the need for chlorine or constant maintenance like salt water pools. 

I want one

(Source: wikingvinning, via jessehimself)


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jessehimself:

"Let her speak when we get to the black topics."

when it’s the loudest thing they see, it colors all else. it’s their problem. keep it there, for them, where it came from.

(Source: lordofthewolves)


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"Blacks comprise 22 percent of the poor, but blacks only take in 14 percent of government benefits. Conversely, whites make up 42 percent of the poor , but take in a disproportionate 69 percent of government benefits." (x) (x)

jessehimself:

food stamps

In so far as divisive political issues go, welfare is the gift that just keeps on giving. Mainly, that’s because some on the right have done a masterful job of convincing ordinary white people that slothful African-Americans and Latinos are eating at a troth filled with goodies…


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